Posts Tagged ‘botanical art’

Pink and White Tulips in Watercolor

Pink and white tulips in watercolor

Happy spring, everybody. I hope you’re enjoying this beautiful Easter weekend. The weather is finally warming up, the redbuds and cherry blossoms are in full bloom, my phlox are beginning their annual spring show, and the tulips will soon be on full display. After the long, cold winter I’m so excited to see these signs of spring.

Pink and white tulips in watercolor.

Cymbidium Orchids in Watercolor

Cymbidium Orchids in watercolor

I’m still playing around with my new scanner this afternoon on yet another rainy day (goodness, when will it end?). Laundry and housework can wait; I’m having way too much fun.

Learning how to use watercolor pigments was certainly a challenge, but it was well worth the effort. I love the bright, transparent, highly saturated colors.

Cymbidium orchids in watercolor. This painting is based on a tutorial in Ann Mortimer’s book, “Orchids in Watercolor.”

Fuchsia and Hummingbird in Watercolor

Fucshia and hummingbird in watercolor

Winter has definitely arrived. It’s dark and rainy and cold today. Even the dogs don’t want to venture outside. It’s been pouring here for hours so lately I’ve been dreaming of spring–as you can see from my latest painting.

I’m a big fan of color so this brightly colored hummingbird tickled my fancy. This painting is based on a tutorial in the book, “Painting Garden Birds” by Sherry C. Nelson. The book is geared towards oil painters, but it translated easily into watercolor. This book has been sitting on my shelves for years. I’m glad I finally pulled it off the shelf and put it to good use.

Yellow and Orange Tulips in Watercolor

yellow and orange tulips

This tulip painting looks deceptively simple but it was time consuming and challenging to paint. I found the giant tulip on the left to be particularly challenging since I had such a large area to cover. The orange areas on the tulips required several washes to create an intense color. I painted the yellow areas first and then washed the orange on top; however, the next time I will reverse the process and paint the dark orange first and then apply a yellow wash on top. Each painting is a learning process.

This painting is for my sister with much love.

Water Lilies in Watercolor

Water lilies in watercolor

My goal for this painting was to keep the subject simple so I could complete it quickly. But looks can be deceiving, and these water lilies proved to be quite time consuming and challenging. It took me several attempts to render realistic dew drops but I finally began to nail them on the leaf on the bottom right-hand corner. Once I figured out the technique, painting dew drops was surprisingly quick and easy.

The swampy water, on the other hand, was even more challenging. It’s definitely not what I envisioned; and I obviously need more practice painting water. If anyone has any tips or tricks for painting water that they’d like to share, I’m all ears!

This painting was based on a tutorial in Linda Ravenscroft’s book, “How to Draw and Paint Fairyland: A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating the World of Fairies.”

My Niece’s Watercolor Tulips

Watercolor tulips in rainbow colors

My niece, Karen, also painted rainbow tulips then tried her hand at stippling with a micron pen, choosing colors to match each flower. She painted the cloudy background without the use of masking fluid, which can be tricky, but she did a fabulous job.

I’m still completing my painting since I spent more time as a host, helper, photographer, and instructor during our family paint-a-thon than I actually did painting. I’ll be posting my painting next.

My Sister’s Watercolor Tulips

Red tulips in watercolor

I’m so excited to show you my sister’s finished watercolor painting. The addition of the swirly texture–inspired by artist Cindy Dauer at TheSlumberingHerd.com–really made this painting come alive. My sister wasn’t thrilled with the dark green background–she felt it obscured the ink details–so I lightened it in Photoshop so she’d be more satisfied with the end result.

After I lightened the background I played with Photoshop’s Hue setting (Image>Adjust>Hue/Saturation) and came up with several variations of her painting in different colors. It looks amazing in the different color combinations and would make a great art grouping in her new house. Are you ready to see this? I’m so excited to share!

Orange tulips in watercolor

In orange and teal. Fabulous!

Pink watercolor tulips

In hot pink and lime. Be still my heart!

Purple tulips in watercolor

In purple and green. Delightful!

Yellow watercolor tulips

In yellow and aqua. What’s not to love? How do you like your painting now, sissy? It’s perfection.

Summer Family Watercolor Fest

Summer family watercolor fest

This past weekend I hosted a family summer watercolor fest. My sister, niece, daughter, and I had a great time painting, chatting, singing Taylor Swift’s annoying song, “we are never-ever-ever getting back together” over and over again, and snacking on caramel macchiatos and homemade brownie cupcakes. The cupcakes were amazing; I’ll be posting the recipe next.

Summer family watercolor fest

For this painting session we thought it would be fun to paint the same painting and compare our individual results. We took this challenge a step further and decided to add texture with pen and ink on top of the completed paintings. We were inspired by the work of artist Cindy Dauer and her Slumbering Herd. If you’re not familiar with Cindy’s work, check out her blog, The Slumbering Herd, and prepare to be delighted.

Summer family watercolor fest

Here, I applied liquid frisket to mask out the tulips, leaves, and stems while I painted the cloudy background.

Summer family watercolor fest

This is my niece, Karen’s painting in progress. It’s upside down in this view because I was sitting across from her when I snapped the photo.

Summer family watercolor fest

This is my sister’s work in progress. She chose colors that closely resembled those in the reference photo, but then went crazy with ink and texture. You won’t believe how many looks she was able to achieve with this painting. I’ll be showing photos of the completed paintings next.

Summer family watercolor fest

This Winsor Newton watercolor chart came in handy when we were choosing the color schemes for our paintings or trying to match a color in a reference photo. If you ever have an opportunity to host or join a painting party, I highly recommend them. They’re lots of fun and a great learning experience.

Pink Miltonia Orchids in Watercolor

Pink Miltonia Orchids Closeup Small

Pink Miltonia Orchids Small

It was a dreary day today–cloudy, cool, and drizzly–not the best day to be outside but a perfect day to stay inside and paint. The soft lighting allowed me to sit by the kitchen windows and paint for hours without interruption from the late afternoon sun. These pink miltonia orchids were a pleasure to paint. The variegated leaves were easy to paint and the brightly colored petals really pop against the dark green background.

This painting was based on a tutorial in the book, “Orchids in Watercolor” by Ann Mortimer.

1 2 3